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From the Clergy

Recent Articles in the Messenger Newsletter

The Rt. Rev. Alex Dickson, Bishop in Residence for Anglican Essentials

    The Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore, Associate for Transformational Discipleship

      The Rev. David P. Booman, Pastoral Care Chaplaincy and Healing Prayer Ministry

      • 12-07-14 “Taking the ‘Dys’ out of Dysfunction” The Rev. David Booman As hard as we try to be of good cheer, the holidays are a time of significant pain for many people. Filled with grief and the acute tensions of family dysfunction, these long weeks are often characterized by survival rather than joy. In today’s gospel passage we discover that there is nothing new under the…

      The Rev. Edward T. McNabb, Minister of Worship and Praise Teams

        Archived Articles in the Messenger Newsletter

        The Rt. Rev. Alex Dickson, Bishop in Residence for Anglican Essentials

        • My First Great Lesson in Stewardship by the Rt. Rev. Alex Dickson In 1951, our four year old son was hit by a truck.  Every bone in his body was broken, and he had multiple skull fractures.  I prayed fervently for his healing.  “Lord, I would do anything to save this little boy”, and then some words came out of my…
        • A Tribute to Karen Turner Karen Turner and her husband Corey and their two children are active members of St. Michael’s. Karen has recently completed a breath taking oil painting of the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple in Jerusalem.  It has been placed above the Altar at the chapel at Bishop Gadsden retirement home here in Charleston.  Jane and…
        • Thank you from Bishop Dickson Thank You, and God Bless You To the Beloved people of St. Michael’s, Jane and I want to express our deep gratitude to you for your prayers for us during the 10:30 service on the Fourth Sunday in Advent, when I suddenly became unconscious.  When I returned to consciousness, and opened my eyes, I saw…
        • GIC 2012 at Bishop Gadsden ~ Reflection by Alex Dickson Bill and Laura Hewitt brought Bishop Dutta to Bishop Gadsden Retirement Community as part of our GIC Mission Week on Friday at 5:00 p.m. We welcomed the 65 people who had gathered to hear Bishop Dutta, and thanked Jan Beebe, and Martha Ann Heyward for inviting and encouraging residents to attend; we also thanked Executive Director, Bill Trayick, and…
        • A Green Cross on St. Patrick’s Day When I wear my purple shirt and a clerical collar, I usually wear a gold cross that was given to me at my Consecration, but this Saturday at the Day of Healing Prayer, I wore a chain of green three leaf clovers because it was St. Patrick’s Day.  Each three leaf clover is a symbol…
        • A Big Thank You from +Alex Dickson WOW! What a Birthday Celebration!  My heartfelt thanks to Al Zadig+, Ashley Severance and all of the Kanuga Team (especially those precious young violinists), “Marilyn Monroe” re Merrilee Kinney, all of those pretty girls that came up to Shag with me, and of course our own Life Group that followed us back to Cashiers for…

        The Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore, Associate for Transformational Discipleship

        • Why a Mosque Should Not Be Built at Ground Zero by the Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore Many reasons have been given for building or not building a mosque within a few blocks of the greatest act of terrorism ever to have occurred on U.S. soil. Even the President has dithered, or so it seems, as to whether this should happen. Where he and I…
        • Suicide In The Ivy League Six students at Cornell University, one at the University of Pennsylvania, and one at Yale took their own lives during the past academic year. One was a noted football player, almost certain to be elected captain. Another was a jokester, great student and kind soul. Two others were from notably affluent communities, Chevy Chase, MD…
        • How Tithing Has Changed my Life by the Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore As a child I was something of a kleptomaniac. Yes, sorry to admit it. I used to steal. Of course it was small change – and I stole mostly from my parents’ “gambling bank” – an old and rather fancy (though out of date) evening purse tucked in…
        • A Fun Read in an Election Year The High Tide of American Conservatism, Davis, Coolidge, and the 1924 Election by Garland S. Tucker, III Were it not that the author of this very time-specific volume is a long-time and dear friend of mine, I would probably not have picked it up at Borders, or anywhere else. But since it was written by…
        • A Surprising Point of Life Some fifteen years ago the rector of a sleepy Episcopal Church in a leafy, semi-rural part of Western Connecticut, had an experience of Christ that changed his life and ministry. George Crocker awoke to find himself really believing in the Gospel he had been ordained to preach, a Gospel that he had never personally embraced.…
        • Jesus Wars: Making Sense of the Modern Quest for the Historical Jesus by the Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore Associated with the Beta: Essential Jesus Course When the United States Supreme Court ruled that prayer was not allowed in our public school system it also ruled that the teaching about religion was perfectly acceptable – as long as it was not done to proselytize. This ruling coincided…
        • Getting Focused Introducing a unique ministry to the “hurting coast.” Independent schools, prep schools, private schools, fee-paying schools – the word used to describe these non-public schools that prepare young people for higher education varies widely. But they all refer to a specific genre in the mix of US education that aims to give qualified students a leg up in the ladder towards better colleges…
        • Away in a Manger: At Christmas, we should remember Christians who are persecuted for their faith. December 23, 2010 4:00 A.M. National Review Online www.nationalreview.com by Paul Marshall For Christians, Christmas commemorates a time not only of joy, but also of threat. At Jesus’s birth, Herod conspired to kill him and murdered all the newborn boys in and around Bethlehem. In recounting this, Matthew’s gospel compares it with “Rachel weeping for…
        • Be a Mentor Channel surfing the other evening my eye caught sight of – yes – our own Jim Stuckey. He was being interviewed on Tammy McCottry-Brown’s show on Comcast’s Channel 2 about what it was like to be mentored by an older, wiser man and how Jim himself had been enormously helped in his career as a…
        • 43 Days Hanging Between Heaven and Hell One man’s bicycle journey across America and the spiritual lessons it taught him. Joseph Martin is a particularly good friend who used to trounce me almost weekly on the tennis courts of Greater Pittsburgh during my years as Dean of Trinity Seminary and afterwards. He had hung up his racquet some years before, having reached…
        • The Joy of Teaching The snow lay all around, and virtually every day I was there more snow came down. On the last day, the temperature warmed enough to create murky slush on the streets. But at least, being away in Ambridge Pennsylvania from January 9-14, I avoided the 2011 ice storm that closed the Arthur Ravenel, Jr. bridge…
        • A Feast of Good Things: Mere Anglicanism 2011 The heavenly banquet we all look forward to can’t be a whole lot more sumptuous than this year’s menu at Mere Anglicanism. This annual conference, in honor this year of Bishop Allison, offered a hearty spread of truly great things to savor – especially if you knew something of the history of 16th Century Anglicanism…
        • One Perfect Day After Another Try to imagine snow-capped peaks set against a crystal blue sky and glistening pine trees encrusted with weeks of heavy snow and ice - a veritable winter wonderland. Now picture yourself gliding down corduroy-groomed trails on freshly waxed skis with a group of friends with whom you had devoured a sumptuous breakfast followed by a…
        • Thriving Christianity The following article appeared in the American Spectator website and was reposted with permission. I think it is worthy of note. ~ The Rev. Dr. Peter Moore Most secular media in the U.S. imply that the world is largely dividing between resurgent Islam and enlightened secularists, with isolated evangelicals and Catholics left on the sideline.…
        • Sobering Thoughts: On the State of Christianity in America In the article entitled “Thriving Christianity,” it had some glowing statistics about the growth of global Christianity, especially in the Southern Hemispheres of our world. It also pointed out that the number of self-styled atheists in America hasn’t grown much beyond the 4% figure that was last recorded in 1944. And, similarly, the percentage of…
        • “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing” The Roots of Evangelicalism and the Birth of English Hymnody By: Bryan Hunter The joy of Easter season has now overtaken the gravity of Lent, but if you feel called to persist with a bit of spiritual discipline, here’s an exercise for you (in two parts): (1) Pick up a copy of The Hymnal 1982 (that’s the easy part) and indentify all of the hymns…
        • A Letter from Holly Craighead: A St. Michaelite Seminarian Greetings fellow St. Michaelites! By now the early spring trees and daffodils have shown their first blooms.  It has been a very long winter in Western Pennsylvania, but new life is emerging!  Everyday I can feel the prayers being sent from South Carolina, and I am truly grateful for them and for your financial support…
        • “You’re the vicar who tweets!” So goes the word on the street around Burscough, a town about 20 miles outside of Liverpool. People are referring to Richard Jones who pastors a growing parish that draws about 420 people to Sunday services. Richard has been visiting St. Michael’s this May as part of a three month sabbatical. You may have encountered…
        • It’s Really Human She was one of those Northeastern society matrons who prided herself on her liberal attitudes, and disdained the conservative zeitgeist in which her inherited money had provided her with a safe cocoon. I can’t remember her name; but it oozed with New York upper crustiness. Somehow at some social function we got talking on the…
        • A Right Sense of Christian Duty: The Rise of Evangelicalism in the 19th-century Protestant Episcopal Church By Bryan Hunter In the last issue, I offered a brief overview of the birth of Evangelicalism within the Church of England. With such significant players as the Wesley brothers and George Whitefield at the forefront of that movement, one could assume, given their activities here, that they also played a significant role in exporting…
        • This Old House: Lament of a Jilted Lover It’s been three long years since someone loved me. Back then my prospects seemed so bright. Why they were even vying for my hand, bidding for my affection. Up and up the price went. Well, not exactly; but it felt that way to me. But that was three years ago, and since then I’ve been…
        • Where does faith come from? Romans 10:9-17 I had a conversation after church with a parishioner about where faith comes from. He told me: “I don’t know why I believe. It all makes no sense that God should become a man, and die for us. It all seems so irrational. But I still believe it.” He also said that he had a…
        • You take the High Road and I’ll take the Low Road: The Death of Cranmer and the Insurgence of the Tractarians By Bryan Hunter On 21 March 1556, deposed Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer stood in a niche carved out below the pulpit of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin in Oxford and delivered his final sermon. He had forwarded an advanced copy of his speech to the authorities, and for the first few…
        • A Week To Remember: Tracing the Footsteps of Early Christians Amid the Ruins of Asia Minor and Greece Swimming in sun-splashed Aegean waters, bargaining in bustling Turkish bazaars, sampling tea and cakes on the lido deck, viewing ancient theatres that held 10,000 Romans built into the side of hills, wading through the hot springs of white-washed Hierapolis – I could go on, but you get the idea: this 2011 Sea Cloud Tour to…
        • My Last Visit With John Stott June 17, 2001 “There was a man sent from God whose name was John” John the Baptist, to whom the above reference refers, was beheaded by a king in a palace at a relatively young age. John Stott, who I met in January of 1957, spent his final days on earth in a small bed-sitter…
        • Surprise in Vermont New Light on the ‘Hurting Coast’ A voice from the past called. He’d heard that I was going to be in Vermont on a reading/writing retreat this past summer, and would I come and preach in his newly-formed Anglican church in Burlington? And so it was that I drove north and stayed with my friend and his Camden (SC) born-and-bred wife.…
        • Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton’s Lessons on Endurance After wandering among ancient Roman sites in Asia Minor this past June, where 2000 years ago young churches struggled with the seductive pull of a secular world, I recalled that one of the great lessons of the Book of Revelation where we read about these churches is endurance. Those young believers -- faced with opposition…
        • The Importance of the Beta Ministry We talk regularly about the critical nature of the Alpha ministry as that ministry that helps bring people to an ‘aha’ moment in their relationship with Christ.  But Beta of course is that critical next step where we begin to walk as Disciples of Christ.  Below is a description of how seriously we take Discipleship…
        • Peter Moore – Testimony of Tithing by Faith “The last part of a man to be converted,” said the famous evangelist D. L. Moody, “is his pocketbook.” “Look in a man’s check book,” said another preacher,“and you will see what that person’s priorities really are.” Fortunately for me, I had some good teaching early on in my Christian life. It centered on the…
        • The Enigma that is Turkey Nothing quite epitomized the enigma that is modern Turkey than something I saw on my stroll through the museum of the Topkapi Palace that sits atop the ancient city of Constantinople. After an obligatory tour of the Sultan’s harem quarters, I emerged to walk through a magnificent garden and on into the museum that houses…
        • From Folly – Matthew Lock Pridgen’s True Story of Fall and Redemption When I first listened to Matthew Pridgen tell me his life story I wasn’t quite sure if he was totally sane. His enthusiasm, contagious smile, penetrating eyes, and intense excitement made me wonder if he was still on something as we sat on the second floor porch of my Mt. Pleasant home two years ago.…
        • Thank You St. Michael’s Reaching a milestone like a 50th anniversary is an occasion for rejoicing. But big anniversaries are always bittersweet. The fact is that you can’t push water back up above the waterfall. Those years are over, and there will be many fewer of them looking ahead than looking back. That aside, my 50th ordination anniversary was…
        • Don’t Bite the Apple: Assessing Genius from a Silvery Cloud The hagiography on Steve Jobs has only just begun. Expect biographies by the truckload, articles in every major news magazine, online tributes and re-runs of speeches. Every thought, feeling, side remark and rumination of this 21st Century genius will be thrust upon us, and his quirky personality and artistic sense of style will become as…
        • Muslim Anti-defamation Laws and Free Speech Disturbing trends in ostensibly democratic nations are currently threatening our fundamental liberties of free speech. Western nations, intimidated by threats of violence from Islamic radicals, are reevaluating the rights of citizens to criticize the beliefs of others with whom they disagree.  Consider the case in Australia where it took hundreds of thousands of dollars and…
        • Ambassadors Extraordinaire While during our fall semester we each think of the call on us to be an “Ambassador for God”, as part of our BETA-level course, we might ponder the witness of two actual ambassadors whose lives have recently broadened my understanding of this call. The first was Father Hugh O’Flaherty, a Vatican official who through…
        • Too True to be Good? Tim Tebow and the Media’s Conundrum I am a football fan, but not a fanatic. I played the game all through high school, but not very well. I was a slow, lumbering right guard who didn’t make his quota of tackles. However, I enjoy watching a good game almost as much as I enjoy the tailgating party beforehand. My childhood was…
        • BONANZA Thanks to the entrepreneurial skills and generosity of Michael Lalich, the leader of one of St. Michael’s Life Groups, two shall-we-say more mature members of the congregation, Sykes Wilford and I, got the chance to venture out into South Carolina waters very early one morning on a Sterling Flat Boat in search of Spot tail…
        • Michelangelo’s Pieta Poem by Jay Haug Slowly, carefully, hand over hand His body lowered down From the cross. Mary reaches toward him, Not knowing whether to assist Or wait to receive it. Casting around for a place, Finally, she sits on Golgotha’s cold stone. Where they lay him on her lap A mother Receiving her firstborn But now in searing grief,…
        • There He Goes Again! Episcopal Bishop Shelby Spong Someone once said that “every heresy begins with an inadequate view of sin.” Downplay sin, and you’ll downplay grace. Downplay grace, and you’ll find no need for the Cross and Resurrection of Christ. Downplay them, and you’ll find no need for Christ at all – except as an example of someone who was sensitive, spiritual,…
        • Is There Really Reality? Oh Boy What a Troublesome Question It began in our men’s group that meets in Room 202 of the Belser Building at 7:30 on Wednesday mornings. One guy asked: “How can teachers (who claim to be Christian) just ignore some of the things Jesus said, and come up with crazy reconstructions that are far from the plain meaning of the Bible?”…
        • Tensions in Nigeria And why they should matter to you and me On Christmas Day 2011, churches were bombed in five Nigerian cities — Madalla, Jos, Kano, Damaturu, and Gadaka — leaving dozens, perhaps hundreds, dead or wounded. The killings were apparently the latest handiwork of the violent Islamist group Boko Haram, and they show an increased level not only of violence but also of sophistication, since…
        • Merry Anglicanism Or that’s how the Lord Bishop of London referred to it Take this little 2 minute quiz: Did you know…. That the Book of Common Prayer had been translated into 200 languages, including Mohawk, as far back as the 17th and 18th Centuries? That there was a campaign to get a bishop for the Church…
        • The Most Unforgettable Person… I Never Knew Decades ago Reader’s Digest used to have a regular feature column entitled “The Most unforgettable character I ever met.” I loved those articles, and have often thought of who I’d write about if and when the time came. Well it’s come. You all know his name because it’s mentioned almost nightly on the news and…
        • Books Worth Reading: For those interested in learning more about mission in general & also the Muslim world Suggestions by Peter Moore The Gospel in a Pluralist Society,  Lesslie Newbigin Christ and…
        • Preachers’ Preachers ~ Reflection on GIC 2012 by Peter Moore Ravi Zacharias and Barry Black are what are called “preachers’ preachers.” They are the kind of preachers other preachers like to listen to. And, of course, laity love to listen to them also. Refreshingly humble, disarmingly direct, hilariously humorous, and penetratingly Scriptural, they capture attention and then hold it for 25-35 minutes. Most of us…
        • When Children Go Astray A Beloved Bishop and His Wife are Murdered The Anglican world was rocked a couple of weeks ago with the brutal murder of one of its more outspoken and faithful bishops. On Sunday February 26th Bishop Robinson Cavalcanti of Recife, Brazil and his wife Miriam were murdered by their 29 year-old adopted son following a quarrel in their home. Where is Recife? It…
        • Vandy and the HHS: Taking a Fresh Look at Religious Liberty We are all aware of the recent ruling of the Health and Human Services that all non-exempt private health insurance plans must provide coverage for all FDA approved contraception methods, sterilization, counseling and education. Even though the President has softened his position a bit by requiring the insurance companies, rather than the religious institutions, to…
        • Roadmap for the Journey: Charting your course, getting your bearings You know what to say to someone who asks you: “Have you been saved?” Depending on their facial expression and attitude, you either want to punch them in the face, or politely respond, as one famous Anglican bishop did: “Do you mean ‘was I saved?’, ‘am I being saved?’ or ‘will I be saved?’ Because…
        • Nearing the End as a Trinity Seminarian- by Holly Craighead This past week has been Reading Week, dedicated to writing papers.  Most of the campus is quiet, save for the few one finds in the library.  This past Wednesday, I went out into my garden to search for new life emerging from the perennial bed planted last spring.  To my delight all of the perennials…
        • Canterbury to Bid Adieu: The A.B.C. Throws in the Sponge Saying that he hopes that his successor has the constitution of an ox and the skin of a rhinoceros. Rowan Williams, the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury, will resign at the end of this year and return to academics. He will become the Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge where he can meander along the River Cam…
        • BUY THIS BOOK! Beyond the Flaming Sword: Poems of Life between Eden and the Cross by Jay Haug OK, you are not a reader of poetry. Neither am I. I almost never pick up a book of poetry and begin reading. I hated reading poetry in literature class at college. I’ve never written more than a few lines of doggerel to celebrate this occasion or that, and the few Limmericks I’ve memorized would…
        • Starry Nights over Switzerland and the Rhone Riverway: Exploring the roots of Huguenot France In just over a year, we will have the opportunity to explore an absolutely lovely part of Europe while digging into some of the great moments of the past. Religion, history, art and wine will all combine to make this the adventure of a lifetime.   From May 15-25th (2013) Peter Moore will lead another…
        • Titanic: Victims and Villains – Revisiting the worst sea disaster in history 100 years later Of the writing of books and making of movies about the sinking of the Titanic there seems to be no end. As the world remembers this horrific tragedy 100 years later, it seems right to revisit it once again if for no other reason than to lay certain ghosts to rest and move on to…
        • MY FIRST VISIT TO GOOSE CREEK They came in carriages, men in powdered wigs, ladies in lace and satin, down the shady lane to the parish church of St. James – located near enough to Charles Towne Landing to be safe from Indian attacks, and yet close to plantations in the area. Very British were these landed gentry who together with…
        • WHERE DO YOU GO – When you’ve really blown it? Reflections on the life and witness of Chuck Colson You go to a friend’s house, of course. With the debacle of Watergate hanging over his neck, with the public outraged at the Nixon administration he served so loyally as a hatchet man, with a prison sentence looming over him on the horizon, Chuck Colson went to see his friend Tom Phillips. Phillips, a quiet,…
        • Are you hooked? Of course not, you say to yourself. But you may be fooling yourself. As someone said “Denial is not a river in Egypt.” Our ability to think we are freer, less dependent, more self-directed, and incapable of being in some kind of “bondage” is like the man who was so annoyed at all the news…
        • Evangelism Doesn’t Justify Everything: Beware the Christian Mafia She waltzed down the aisle in the Crystal Cathedral, pinkish blond locks flowing, arms waving to well-wishers, flowers everywhere, celebrities ready to take part in the wedding ritual. It was Janice Crouch -- hardly a symbol of the demur mother-of-the groom – making a grand entrance at her son’s wedding. But Janice Crouch I was…
        • That Old Chestnut: Predestination and Free Will It started with a question from a parishioner who called me on the phone and asked “How do we reconcile God’s choice of us and our choice of God?” But, of course, the question didn’t start with his call. It’s an age-old question that has bedeviled theologians through the centuries and continues to do so…
        • A Letter to the Editor of the Post & Courier: Breezy Multiculturalism Raises Questions To Leonard Pitts, Jr. question in an op-ed piece in the Post and Courier, April 12, 2012: “Why can’t we elect a Muslim president?” the answer is, of course, we can, legally. But the real question is whether we should? Pitts’ breezy multiculturalism ignores a fundamental difference between classical Islam’s view of the relationship of…
        • A Rant During my summer break, I sometimes worship at other Charleston churches and recently visited a congregation associated with the P.C.A. (Presbyterian Church of America). I later spoke on their behalf at a zoning board meeting at the request of our own Gus Marjenhoff. When I was among them, I found much of their worship similar…
        • Not Inevitable Alex Sanders made his case for the inevitability of gay marriage (5/29/12) based on three factors. First, that the Bible’s prohibition of homosexuality is nullified because of its justification of slavery. Second, that disapproval of same-sex marriage is like rejecting inter-racial marriage, which we all know is a product of pure prejudice. And, third, that…
        • White Nights in Russia Smokers welcome! As South Carolina moves closer to the time when smoking may  be banned in all public indoor places, there’s one spot on the earth where if you want to take a drag you’ll be welcomed with open arms: Russia. Winston-Salem must be getting rich on the backs (and throats) of smokers who abound…
        • Scaling the Heights Reflections on a Summer’s Mountain Climb What on earth was I doing thinking that at my advanced age I could still make a significant climb on a New Hampshire section of the Appalachian Trail? OK, I had done it several times before; but with an ache here and a sore muscle there, was I crazy to think I could do it…
        • Two Books That Have Challenged Me You’ve all heard about the new book by a Navy SEAL who participated in the mission to kill Osama bin Laden. No Easy Day by Marc Owen is currently under intense scrutiny by the Defense Department that charges it reveals classified information and jeopardizes the safety of future missions by Navy’s special forces personnel. But…
        • Once in a Blue Moon “It only happens once in a blue moon.” How many times have you said that? More than you can count. But can you tell me what a blue moon is? A blue moon is a full moon that occurs once every few years when in a 3- month period you have not just three full…
        • Could Jesus Have Had a Wife? Of course he could ! He was fully human, felt the emotions a first century male would have felt, and even interacted with women in a far more open way than many of his contemporaries. If God had sent his son into the world and chosen to have him marry, so be it. But to…
        • Thinking About Justice – or Not I have to confess that I don’t think about justice very much. As a pretty conservative person, I more or less rely on the courts, the government, the police, and the laws to enforce justice. I tend to think the system is pretty fair, and so I trust it to enforce justice. This leaves me…
        • Celebrating Nate’s Accomplishment Oxford University doesn’t give away degrees. They are earned through hard work, slogging away with books in libraries until late in the evening, salty interaction with probing tutors, and writing long papers on sometimes arcane subjects. University life goes on all around this intense study time, but the heart of an Oxford experience is the…
        • Justin Welby to Lead Anglican Communion If someone were to draw a cartoon of Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury-elect, he might draw a sophisticated oil executive wearing a crown of thorns. And the caption might read: “Welcome to the most dysfunctional organization in the world.” That dysfunctional church is quickly learning about this man who has only been a bishop…
        • Meet the Nones Now that the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life has documented the “nones” are the fastest-growing and now second-largest religious constituency in the United States, constituting one of every five Americans, who are they? There’s an old line in regard to relationships that says, “To know me is to love me.” Perhaps. But here’s…
        • Whither South Carolina? Envisioning a Lively Future I see a new day for the Diocese of South Carolina. We live in almost certainly the most Anglican city in all the Americas. Our glorious church buildings, beautiful choirs, commodious ancillary facilities (like Camp St. Christopher, Canterbury House, etc.), and most especially our gifted Gospel-centered bishops and clergy will continue to lift up God’s…
        • Did Jesus have to be born of a Virgin? Rethinking the Virgin Birth There are so many aspects of what we know as “the Christmas story” that are grounded on tradition more than history, that some wonder if the whole thing wasn’t a sweet myth made up by later Christians to sugar coat the birth of the Savior. For example, were there three kings who came to present…
        • 12-24-12 “No Room in the Inn” The Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore Printable Version
        • 01-06-13 “The Kingdom’s Nearness” The Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore Printable Version
        • A Look Into the Beyond – Or Not? Are you the sort of person who gets excited about reports of near death experiences, out of body visions, soul trips to heaven and back, and rapturous spiritual experiences? It takes a special person; but these days reports of supernatural revelations are legion, and given the fascination with the paranormal they are only bound to…
        • Pictures at an Exhibition: Tattoo Art and God’s Call “So you want to start a church? Here? This is one of the most God-forsaken parts of the city. There are more bars here per capita than in any other city in America. The streets are full – especially on weekends – of drifters seeking an escape from the boredom of unfulfilled lives, and of…
        • Sayyid Qutb: Do you know this man? You should! Behind every enduring movement is an intellectual wizard whose views form the basis of the movement’s ideology. In respect to the Muslim Brotherhood, whose Mohammed Marsi now is the Prime Minister of Egypt, that wizard has a name. It’s Sayyid Qutb (1909-1966). Born and educated in Egypt, and for two brief years a student in…
        • “In, But Not of, the World” How Far Would You Go to Preserve the Faith You Love so Much? These days many Anglicans and Episcopalians are asking themselves this question. With the separation of the Diocese of South Carolina from The Episcopal Church we link arms with a long tradition of believing Christians who for one reason or another have felt the need to separate from other professing Christians. Opinions as to the wisdom…
        • Machine Gun Preacher –A must movie In 2004 Sandra and I flew to the northernmost part of Uganda to visit a couple of theological seminaries in the city of Arua. The Ugandan seminary was relatively well appointed. Its faculty joyful. Its students adequately fed and eager to learn. The Sudanese seminary, across town, was a study in contrasts. Bare buildings, dirt…
        • Water Missions International Comes of Age Ever since a brilliant engineer and his wife caught a vision of helping eradicate water-borne diseases by providing safe drinking water for some of the world’s poorest and neediest people Water Missions International has stunned observers who’ve watched the fruit of this Charleston-based entrepreneurial effort be borne. George and Molly Greene launched out in 2001…
        • Cat in a Hot Tin Boat: Pondering the award-winning film Life of Pi There is a reason why Ang Lee’s film, Life of Pi, was nominated for 11 Academy Awards at the 2013 celebration, and won four – more than any other film. It is simply a stunning film that sneaks up on you because of its eye-popping visual effects and its portrayal of a young man’s quest…
        • New Wineskins 2013 I must confess the reason that I decided at the late hour to attend New Wineskins this year on behalf of St. Michaels was linked with the urgent call to get ahead of the curve for the team planning responsibilities that I had accepted for GIC 2014. Where else would you be able to find…
        • GO TO SEMINARY Without Leaving Charleston: Announcing The Ridley Institute You’ve been waiting for a chance to sink your teeth into a true graduate-level course in Bible, Theology, Mission, Apologetics, Church History, Greek, or even Hebrew. But why do all that work without getting academic credit? Wait no longer. Through the foresight of the clergy leadership at St. Andrew’s, Mt. Pleasant, and with the guidance…
        • My Muslim Encounter in London Decades ago when I was beginning my studies as a graduate student in Oxford, I spent a Sunday afternoon wandering in London’s Hyde Park. Near Marble Arch I discovered Speaker’s Corner where wild and wooly men (and some brave women too) held forth on subjects from religion to politics to social issues, facing the often…
        • Elizabeth Cooper Seminarian Report I am attending Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, working towards an MAR (Master of Arts in Religion) with a concentration in Biblical studies.  I intend to remain a lay person because the priesthood of all believers has always been an important concept to me.  Being a lay person allows me to carry on Christ’s…
        • John Sosnowski Seminarian Report Dear St. Michaels, I have just completed my exams and turned in my last paper for the Easter Term of my first year in seminary. It is with great sense of relief and accomplishment that I report this to you. You, St. Michaels, as our sending parish, have been so very much invested in my…
        • Heart Of Darkness: Journey To A Broken Land The view to distant Fuego, the 12,340-foot monster volcano that towered over the horizon past the mown green lawns and mountainous countryside, couldn’t have been more lovely. Topiary trees shaped like teapots graced the play area, and tidy dormitory buildings framed a well-kept soccer field. Green was the predominant color, as this was Guatemala’s rainy…
        • Standing Together: A Call To Save The Church ~ Article by The Rev. Dr. Peter C. Moore & Charles Waring St. Michael’s has been in existence for some 262 years, but it has never faced a challenge like the one it currently faces. Based solely on its previous litigious record, if The Episcopal Church (TEC) has its way, every last piece of property ‑ the church building, the parish hall, the office building, the rectory…
        • A Most Agonizing Moment – In My Ministry I was fairly new at the job of being Dean/President of Trinity Seminary in Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and I very much wanted our capital campaign to succeed. The Board had set a goal for itself that was well beyond what we had thought our support base could reach. In fact, each year was a huge stretch…
        • How the East African Revival Saved the Anglican Communion I stood there with my wife, Sandra, in 2004 and whispered to myself: here is where God began to save the Anglican Communion. We were visiting Kabare in the central western part of Uganda. We were there to take a look at an Anglican theological seminary, and visit the grave of Bishop Festo Kivengere a…
        • A Fateful Day It was March 21, 1554, and the weather wasn’t particularly good. The sermon the Archbishop was about to hear would have been preached outdoors, but instead it would be preached in Great St. Mary’s, the University Church. The scene is depicted in a famous etching in John Foxe’s book Acts and Monuments, published in 1563.…

        The Rev. David P. Booman, Pastoral Care Chaplaincy and Healing Prayer Ministry

        • Welcome David Booman Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, Grace and Peace to you in the name of our Lord. It is with the greatest joy that I take this opportunity to introduce myself and share a little bit about my journey to St. Michael’s. I was born on the frozen tundra of Minnesota, where Garrison Keillor is…
        • Day of Healing Prayer Reflections Less than three weeks after coming on board to be the new assistant for pastoral chaplaincy and healing prayer, I was privileged to be part of St. Michael’s 45th Day of Healing Prayer, led by Fr. Al Zadig, Jean Corbett, Fr. Ted McNabb, and a special guest, the Rev. Nigel Mumford (the Tom Brady of the…
        • Ordination Reflection For the past few years, as I have looked back over the course of my life, I have felt that three days in particular might qualify for the “Greatest Day of My Life” category: (1) the day Caity and I became engaged (2) the day we were married (3) the day in the spring of…
        • Hopes for WOW My hope for Worship on Wednesday is that it will be an evening of surprises; that as we step out in faith into this new vision of what worship, table-fellowship, groups, and classes might look like, the Lord will meet us and surprise us anew with His extravagant Goodness. I especially hope that we will…
        • Prayerful Foundations and the Healing of the Lord Until recently, I had never participated in a weekly prayer meeting, let alone led one. However, as I look back over this fall’s Worship on Wednesday (WOW) prayer meeting, I can say without question that it was one of the most meaningful experiences of corporate prayer and worship with which I have ever been blessed.…
        • Reflection on Prayer in the Park On the afternoon of Sunday, September 22, at 4:00, more than one hundred of God’s people gathered in Washington Square Park (across the street from St. Michael’s) to pray for tahe city of Charleston and the nation. At this precarious and confusing time in our national life, we joined together to create a positive example…
        • Eucharistic Visitors On Sunday, the 29th of September, Fr. Al Zadig commissioned ten St. Michaelites as Eucharistic Visitors. After a season of prayer and discernment, the leadership of St. Michael’s felt the Lord calling us to equip, empower, and deploy a team of faithful believers to bring the Sacrament to those who, for a variety of reasons,…
        • Letter to the Clergy Dear David, You may recall that I was sitting in in your pew box at St. Michael’s on Sunday morning, January fifth. You and your wife were very gracious to me. We had warm conversation after the service, and I thoroughly relished the service and our conversation. I was just about to retire from the…

        The Rev. Edward T. McNabb, Minister of Worship and Praise Teams

        • “I Can’t Sing… So Why Should I?” How many times have I heard this one over the decades I’ve been leading worship music!  In every congregation on Sunday mornings while worship songs are being sung I look around and see a number of people, men mostly, standing with mouths clamped shut, padlocked, looking like stoic bumps on a log. “I can’t sing….so…
        • Morning Prayer at St. Michael’s: A Slight Adjustment Let me “cut to the chase” first, then I’ll give you a little background in case you’re interested.  In 2011 we are going to move the placement of the sermon in the Morning Prayer service at 10:30. Until now the sermon has been placed at the end of the Morning Prayer liturgy.  The simple change…
        • The Most Important Week of The Year: A Reflection from The New Guy by the Rev. Ted McNabb Being an Episcopalian all my life and now with thirty three years of ordained ministry under my belt, in terms of the Anglican vision for Holy Week and the liturgy that honors it I’m an old hand.  But in terms of walking this yearly journey of honor and faith at…
        • The Unconquerable Cross The big wooden cross is striking when viewed against the backdrop of Charleston harbor.  It is placed by First Baptist Church at the apex of the walkway that runs the length of the Battery wall a few days before Easter in anticipation of the Sunrise Service.  St. Michael’s and First Baptist team up to offer…
        • Gifts For Worship After a ten year hiatus I’m starting again to work on lyric and song composition.  It’s slow going.  But, then, it’s always been that way for me.  My point in beginning my article this way is, really, to say thank you.  Through my being given (in my now semi-retired state) the opportunity to serve St.…
        • A Way of Life For me (and I know I speak for Annetta as well) the most important conversion in our approach to church stewardship was not tithing.  It was having our spiritual eyesight healed to the point where we realized stewardship is not really a “segment” of our Christian life, it is a general orientation to our life. …
        • Commentary on O Search oh My God Rob McRae and I have been encouraging one another to find ways to break back into old creative territory.  For me that would mean the realm of lyric writing.  As I mentioned in my last article (Gifts For Worship), the reentry point for me in the writing of lyrics came via an invitation from an…
        • Things Don’t “Just Happen” The thing about a routine (whether it’s a good routine or a bad habit) is that after a while they become so woven into the fabric of your experience that you tend not to notice them anymore.  It gives the impression that things happen because they always “just seem to happen.”  I want to apply…
        • Worship: Breathing in the Garden of God For years now I have taught that “life” in Biblical terms means so much more than “existence.”  One can exist in solitary confinement, but that is not life.  That is a life sentence more accurately known as “hell.” Let me try to build a train of thought here. When Scripture speaks of life it is…
        • The Need for WOW In thinking of the community life of a church as a whole I tend to see it in two parts: preparation and celebration.  This I think is the breathing rhythm of the Christian life be it individual or corporate.  We play out the drama of this rhythm on Sunday morning within the liturgy of our…
        • Why Advent? Why do we worship the way we do in Advent? As Christmas gets closer the waiting becomes harder.  The preparations of Advent accumulate.  The tree is bought.  Decorations continue to be added piece by piece.  Wrapped presents begin to appear.  Plans to receive family and friends or to travel to them are finalized.  Anticipation builds. As you read this Christmas is almost in reach! The…
        • A View From The Top: Opening Night for GIC by The Rev. Ted McNabb Needing to get to work on my own preparations, I got to the Hibernian Hall early enough to see the room rather bare… a big box, empty and waiting.   Most of my work was up on the stage, so I had kind of a bird’s eye view of everything.  Here are just a few mental…
        • Preparations for Setting Sail I might as well tell you now that I’m going to end up in the article telling you (very thankfully) about Ann Hester Willis coming on board as a volunteer to assist and help me manage the sundry details attached to “all things worship” at St. Michael’s. But permit me to lay a bit of…
        • Making Room For More: Sunday 8:45 am Family Communion Service Ends Pruning is the art of channeling more resources to a promising productive area of a plant by removing altogether a branch that is not quite as productive.  That’s the motive behind the decisions of a good gardener tending and being a good steward of the growing things placed under his or her care.  With that…
        • Psalm of The Anvil Occasionally I will find myself writing something that just seems to come out in the form of verse.  People don’t really buy books of poetry much anymore.  I know I don’t.  But I still love the music of words especially when, with a bit of cadence and rhyme, they are able to express to the…
        • Eucharistic Visitors On Sunday, the 29th of September, Fr. Al Zadig commissioned ten St. Michaelites as Eucharistic Visitors. After a season of prayer and discernment, the leadership of St. Michael’s felt the Lord calling us to equip, empower, and deploy a team of faithful believers to bring the Sacrament to those who, for a variety of reasons,…
        • Lost in Wonder, Love, and Praise This Messenger contains a feast of GIC reflections. Here is an addition to this marvelous potluck dinner. Let me share with you what it was like to be on stage Friday evening at the Charleston Music Hall. I look around me. Those in music leadership were all dressed in black. At St. Michael’s when the…
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